Cultural consulting & multicultural marketing

Sometimes a nod means no? Really?

Cross-Cultural Consulting

YES. GESTURES, SYMBOLS, EVEN COLORS have a vast array of meanings around the world and can be just as important as the message itself. It is not just text, but also the context of your message that our experts think and advise you about.  At InterNation, our cultural experts around the globe can help you say what you mean and avoid confusing—not to mention embarrassing—cross-cultural gaffs.

W

hen standard translation is not appropriate for your creative copy, InterNation’s expertise can provide transcreation and creative copywriting services for branding, marketing and advertising campaigns that are sensitive to cultural nuances and the intended target audience.  We work with some largest advertising agencies in the world as well as in-house corporate departments honing their messages to perfection.

Other services in support of marketing and advertising include:

Foreign Market Research

When required, InterNation undertakes research to find out what sells and how to sell it anywhere in the world.  This includes desk and field research, interviews and questionnaires.

Product and Brand Name Analysis

Avoid linguistic and cultural bloopers by contracting InterNation to research possible unintended consequences of a product or brand name.

Focus Group Analysis

InterNation polls groups of trained linguists and cultural consultants who know the ins and outs of regional variations in any language, as well as cultural customs and taboos.

Back Translation

So you can be sure nothing has been lost in translation, InterNation will translate your target language back into the source language.  This can be a critical endgame step in the adaptation and localization of promotional and advertising copy.

And sometimes up means down and even really big companies make really embarrassing mistakes!

  • Raise your eyebrows to an American and you’re skeptical or surprised, but a Greek will think you simply agree.
  • Even English can be confusing: In the U.S. to “table a motion” means that it will not be discussed, while in Great Britain the same phrase denotes “bringing it to the table for discussion.”
  • In English, you kill two birds with one stone.  But in German, you swat two flies with one stroke and in Korean you catch two fish with one hook.